Dec 16, 2019 / Architecture
Cherry Camp Nuglar by Lillit Bollinger and Buchner Bründler Architects

Cherry Camp Nuglar is a minimalist residence located in Nuglar, Switzerland, designed by Lillit Bollinger and Buchner Bründler Architects. The 1968 building in Nuglar was part of a distillery with a wine store. The house served as a warehouse, a shop and above all as a receiving point for cherries. The construction borders directly on the former distillery from the 1920s. As a warehouse, the building has high rooms, which were hardly connected with each other and with the outside space. It originally consisted of two halves, separated by an almost continuous, load-bearing wall, only connected by the goods lift. In one half a filigree wooden ceiling emerged, the other half consists of a huge garage with steel girders and a concrete ceiling. An apartment and an architecture studio are built.

Delivery and garage remain as a workshop, in addition, a small structure is placed on top of the garage. The division of the building into two is lifted along the valley side in favor of a very long, narrow room that includes the kitchen and living area. The existing windows with a parapet height of 2.50m are cut down to the seat height. A long steel window box is placed outside these openings. Inner walls are removed or provided with openings. If these are open in summer, a large meandering overall space is created. The hall of the former shop contains room furniture with a bathroom, toilet, cupboards and guest rooms, which forms room niches and divides the entire space into a living and studio area.

On the street side, the studio shows itself with new green window furniture, which invites you to linger outside as a long bench. In addition to the wooden ceiling, the warehouse consists primarily of concrete. Concrete and wood are therefore added as new materials. The layering and joining of the material is always shown, the surfaces are rough and haptic. Existing materials are not renovated, but left with all their signs of wear as they are. All wooden installations and doors are built directly on site with the joiner. Fine, precise detailing contrasts the raw immediacy of the material.

Photography by Rory Gardiner